Engine Modding Guide:Mild Jobs(Finding the lost horses)

Discussion in 'DIY Zone - The Techincal Era' started by Dhhawal, Nov 2, 2011.

  1. Dhhawal

    Dhhawal New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2011
    Messages:
    1,292
    Likes Received:
    26
    Okay, so you want your ride to go faster, and sound meaner, so what do you do?

    Mild Jobs:
    Cold air intake
    [​IMG]

    Free flow header
    [​IMG]

    Cat back exhaust system(for that gorgeous sound)

    [​IMG]
    Fuel pressure regulator(Rising rate) making sure your engine isn't starved of fuel at wide open throttle.

    [​IMG]
    all of this should you cost you in the region of about 35k, with top notch branded stuff. This is what i would recommend to a person who is constricted by his finances or who has got a car with an engine capacity less than 1300cc. This should/will give you an increase about 10%. And on a small car its going to be even more noticeable. Exhaust systems and intakes are designed to manufacture specifications why are driven by financial concerns as well as packaging constraints. So by doing some of the previously mentioned mods, you are basically helping the engine breath freely and allowing some of the horses that were there, find their way onto the tarmac.

    If you don't feel satisfied you can also go for retune of your ecu, but be warned, these are not cheap, and you can't return your car to stock either, however, you can also go in for a piggyback unit, which won't be as effective, is cheaper and is quite less invasive, also you'll be able to return the car to stock mode when you do finally sell it. ECU remaps, allow you to get the maximum out of your existing setup with a tailor made fuel and ignition maps to suit your driving style. Something a piggyback ecu can't do. However, some ecu's can't be remapped so please research on the net before assessing the suitability for a remap.
     
  2. Codename.47

    Codename.47 Guest

    what about bigger injectors and changing premium spark plugs . changing lifters and cranks?
     
  3. Dhhawal

    Dhhawal New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2011
    Messages:
    1,292
    Likes Received:
    26
    bigger injectors are needed if you go for forced induction(turbo), stock injectors can otherwise handle a small increase in injector duty cycles, as they are mostly operating at 50%, getting premium spark plugs and ignition kits only make sense when you are going forced induction(turbo), i.e when you're trying to ignite air fuel mixture under pressure, thats where highvoltage ignition is relevant, on such a mild job, a spark plug upgrade will do just fine...say move from bosch to ngk..but iridium would be overkill, lifters then again, by themselves can't do much good, except the fact that the engine can rev higher, you'll also need to change the cam, and go for a 270-300 cam, which will have a rough idle...cranks would only need to be changed if the big end dia is too small and you're going forced induction..
     
  4. Codename.47

    Codename.47 Guest

    oh yeah true

    so Adding a turbo will get the lost horses*

    *conditions apply
     
  5. Dhhawal

    Dhhawal New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2011
    Messages:
    1,292
    Likes Received:
    26
    you make horses when you add a turbo..but a turbo is striaght up job if a bolt on kit is available for your car, if it ain't well then you are in a lil bit of a problem area..
     
  6. Codename.47

    Codename.47 Guest

    ya but adding a turbo is a big job apart from bolt on part.. u still need a proper compatible ECU to work with isnt it

    Same like Gagan had issues in the past turboing his silvia
     
  7. Dhhawal

    Dhhawal New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2011
    Messages:
    1,292
    Likes Received:
    26
    yep, but it depends..the silvia was designed as a sports car..so mostly what it involves is chipping your ecu, and it also depends on the features of the hardware, you have to have an MAF..or even better yet an MAP, cam angle sensor to set boost retard..if your ecu isn't chipable, then you've got a problem, then you can either get a standalone..which is a big pain in the rear as far as wiring is concerned, or you can run a parallel ecu..in that case later you can return your car to stock as well as exploiting the fun parts of the standalone...fuel and ignition maps, compatibility is not as big an issue as getting your tune right..varying conditions of intake air temperature, fuel quality can wreak havoc with your maps, when you turbo a daily city runaround..it becomes a much more of a complicated process especially as far as reliablity is concerned
     
  8. Codename.47

    Codename.47 Guest

    well two standalone ECU's in one car is complicated and time consuming effort itself and will need whole bunch of sensors around the car
     
  9. Dhhawal

    Dhhawal New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2011
    Messages:
    1,292
    Likes Received:
    26
    not at all...the stock ecu handles the regular chores of the car, like idle adjustment for load(when you switch on the ac) alternator charging, and other auxillaries..so basically you don't need to wire those, and connect/configure them, which is a time consuming process, and i maintain should only be limited to race cars...on a street setup, you need many luxuries that you wouldn't take for granted on a race car
     
  10. Codename.47

    Codename.47 Guest

    but still I guess adding a standalone ECU can't be just that easy

    When you think of this , You have to add a sensor on intake and exhaust (if am not mistaken) , Injectors controls , temp readings etc etc ECU needs those info isnt it :?
     
  11. Dhhawal

    Dhhawal New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2011
    Messages:
    1,292
    Likes Received:
    26
    you're right bud....its not easy as you have to figure out the coding for the wiring harness that is already installed..which wire goes where..and does what, and you have to tap into which wires..which are the compulsory inputs..and the compulsory outputs, so yeah..its not easy but its the only way to fly
     

Share This Page